Beyoncé and Information Literacy!

On Saturday, 23rd April 2016, Beyoncé surprised the music would (and everyone else), by releasing a visual album, Lemonade.

The album is loaded with pop culture and historical references as well as many collaborations. It is, therefore, very useful as an information literacy tool (as well as being a great piece of visual and musical art)!

Art is Information, Part I – Exploring the research methodologies of artists in Beyoncé’s ‘Lemonade’ #libeyrianship – https://medium.com/@CityThatReads/art-is-information-part-i-9d0cbc35907c#.j7uqtyqzh

Beyoncé’s ‘Lemonade’ and Information Resources – http://libguides.mica.edu/lemonade

Blog post and LibGuide both by Jenny Ferretti, Digital Initiatives Librarian at Decker Library, Maryland Institute College of Art.

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Information Literacy & Summon

Information Literacy and Summon was held at Sheffield Hallam University on 18th July 2012 – how using web-scale discovery impacts on your information literacy teaching. Summonil2012 is the blog for the event, with entries that weI want to be a real duckre live blogged during the presentations and follow-up pieces.

~ MultiSearch is the name chosen for Summon at WIT Libraries.

Image: Health students take to Summon like ducks to water at University of Huddersfield!

Search Engines for Research

Search engines are one way of finding information, but it is best to use the scholarly web for, well, scholarly information. 20 Useful Speciality Search Engines for College Students is a recent blog post listing just such websites.

DOAJ and ERIC are listed and these are also available on our databases page. Intute is also listed and we at WIT Libraries Learning Support have long championed that excellent resource. Some of the websites are American focused so will be useful depending on needing US info. Google Scholar is, of course, on the list and just to remind you that it now links into WIT Libraries.

Two not on the list – Scirus, science-specific search engine and JURN, academic search engine for arts and humanities.

search-engines

Library Guide featuring Zombies!

As the new semester approaches and our thoughts turn to innovative ways to teach information literacy, the staff at McPherson College’s Miller Library in Kansas, USA, have come up with one of the most innovative library guides I’ve come across. ‘Library of the Living Dead’ is a library guide in graphic novel format featuring zombies, librarians and two confused students.  Here is the blog post announcing the guide – http://blogs.mcpherson.edu/library/2011/03/our-zombie-guide-is-finished/

Please note: Rest assured that WIT Libraries are a zombie free zone!

Image: http://office.microsoft.com/en-ie/images/similar.aspx#ai:MP900442180|

Access to Information

William Kamkwamba: How I harnessed the wind

William is a boy in Malawi who built a windmill for his family based on plans from a few library books. It highlights the importance of, not just using information when you get it, but access to information in the first place. Also, shows the never-ending importance of libraries. Yay for libraries!

TED: (Technology, Entertainment, Design) Ideas Worth Spreading

TEDucation: 5 Talks Librarians Should Watch (and Why), blog post, lists this video and four other videos that provide library staff with food for thought.

Awful Library Books

Image: Clip Art

Awful Library Books is a blog which lists books the bloggers find amusing and questionable for public libraries – “None of the books presented are particularly awful (okay, maybe some are).  These books are just odd, outdated or maybe should be reconsidered under a current interpretation of collection policies.” 

http://awfullibrarybooks.wordpress.com/ 

Wonder what books we have that could be listed on this blog?!